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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the new york stock exchange. as we hurry toward the edges of the fiscal cliff, this market holding its breath. but holding up. >> yes, so far. technology one of the few bright spots with apple rebounding after that huge decline we saw yesterday. its worst day in four years. it's got everybody on wall street scratching their heads trying to figure out what the problem is with apple. at any rate, here's where we stands right now. sort of a meandering day for the markets. some economic data out this morning. the market responding to that. then a sideways move after that. the nasdaq benefitting from the rebound in technology yesterday. up 11.5 points on the thatnasda. the s&p is also trading higher. there it is. up 2.5 points on the s&p. >> meanwhile, bullish sentiment at an eight-month high right now. equity allocation is still at the lowest level of the year according to the american association of individual investors survey that was out this weekend. stock in a wait-and-see mode. totally understandable until these fiscal issues are resolved. >> but don't just sit on your hands. there i
one major stock clearing house was raising margin requirements. and then there's the fiscal cliff. analysts citing fears about a hike in capital gains tax in 2013. rick santelli has been talking about this, though, the things that were up in 2012, those are the things being sold now, whether that be gold or any number of assets that rose appreciably over the course of the last year. we'll be talking about the future of apple and the outlook for its stock a little later this morning with jonathan geller of the boy genius report. >> good old bump on the road on the way to a trillion dollar market cap. got to 600 pretty easily. and now it's back at 500. above 600 i guess. tough to get to a trillion dollar market cap. cisco got to 600 billion once, too. it's at 100 billion. apple still at 500. we talked about are they going to come out with the chartreuse slightly smaller mini ipad. and that's going to be the -- a lot of people waiting in line for that one. >> i do have to say, i'm in the market for a mini ipad. >> not for the max ipad? >> no, i want something smaller to carry around,
catching a lot of people by surprise. >> it's a fiscal cliff decline. this is the greatest capital gains generator of our lifetime. i would love to see what the gains are going to be next year. but i would be saying you need to sell it. we have no idea where the capital gains are going to go, we're going to go over the fiscal cliff, what do you have to lose, the rates are going to go up. i don't think it makes any difference two tim geithner says. >> it is so widely held by so many who want to play the stock market, let's say, beyond just the capital gains, whether it's in taxable account organization not and it also has the psychological impact that this is the one that i'm going to get out of because i'm afraid of what's coming in general? >> this is the stock, yes, it's cheap, now once it goes down, we have a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the marke
it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is monday. but not for any earnings. not for any releases. that's when we process the results of the weekend talk shows, which you now have to watch as if we were instead of watching, you know, colleg
a moment. we do want to begin with the markets and that looming fiscal cliff. the dow finishing november lower for the second consecutive month. the blue chips falling half a percent in november. and #% sinnasdaq and s&p did fi higher last month. six out of ten sectors managed to post a gain. consumer discretionary stocks up the most. utilities the biggest losers. and while individual trading sessions may have been choppy, it was another month of low volatility. the vix remained below 20 for the fourth consecutive month and that's the longest streak since february of 2007. a big part of the market story has obviously been a big topic dominating the sunday talk shows. tim geithner arguing republicans need make the next move in negotiations. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms or they would like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what they would like as an alternative. build on those, tell us how. but we can't react to anything until we see the details of the proposal and we need it on the rates and revenue side as well as on the spending side.
of job growth. a fiscal cliff go over -- >> snatching victory from the jaws. >> a superstorm. nothing can stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers c
on in town. in washington news, both parties hinting at renewed talks on the fiscal cliff. the acknowledgement of open lines of communication passed for encouraging news. a new survey finds more than 60% of leading investment professionals predict a shorp stock decline in the market if the government fails to come up with a deal. in this case defined as a more than 10% drop in the dow. 56% surveyed foresee a deal to avoid the cliff by year end, 44% predict failure in the ongoing negotiations. as for corporate america, through yesterday's close, there have been # 70 announcements of special dividends. these special difference deebds are valueded a more than $30.1 billion. among the latest names, mcgraw hill will pay a special dividends of $2.50 a share before year end. and drop its previously announced plan to buy back up to $200 million more of stock this year. >> everybody's paid their dividends this year, so they won't be paying them next year. >> this is a major issue. what's going to happen is -- we have two great economists onset. but that money will get annualized, s
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
than not. >> all right. well, with 25 days to go until the year-end fiscal cliff deadline, president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone yesterday for the first time in days. both men agreed not to publicly characterize how the conversation went. but the stalemate in negotiations entered new territory yesterday with treasury secretary tim geithner suggesting the white house is ready to go off the cliff if republicans refuse to raise taxes on the 2%. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans -- remember, it's only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large, it can't be solved without rates going up as part of that. again, i think there's broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option republicans are reportedly considering is to accept tax cuts for the middle class, allow rates to go up for the wealthiest, and then start the fight over again during de
to be permanent. and on top of it, for me, the bigger question is the fiscal cliff debate rather than a growth cliff debate is what we've got wrong. >> whatever the news is, at this point, everyone -- it comes down to certainty, whatever it is, doesn't it at this point? joining us now from capitol hill, maybe we'll get an answer here, republican representative from washington and the new chairwoman of the house republican conference, congratulations, congresswoman, kathy mcmorris rodgers, good to have you on the show this morning. >> thanks. >> great to have you here. >> great to be with you. >> you've heard part of this debate. >> yes. >> how do republicans knowing we have to raise revenue, how do republicans raise the type of revenue that needs to be raised? >> well, republicans believe that this is the time for big solutions, for laying out that framework so it's not just a quick fix, but a appraisal fix. and as you were just talking about, the rates, what we really need that -- focusing on the top 2% is really a straw man. what we need is a tax reform in america for middle class families a
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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